Koko Head, Hawaii

Koko Headcape and landmark, Honolulu county, on the southeastern coast of Oahu island, Hawaii, U.S.It lies across from Diamond Head 9 miles (14 km) east on Maunalua Bay. Formed by secondary volcanic eruptions of the Koolau Range more than 10,000 years ago, the cape (whose name means “blood” or “red earth”) is pocked by numerous tuff craters, relics of the island’s last volcanic activity. These include Koko Head Crater, at an elevation of 642 feet (196 metres) near Kawaihoa Point, and Koko Crater (Hawaii’s tallest tuff ring), which rises to 1,207 feet (368 metres). According to legend, Koko Crater was formed when Pele, the goddess of fires and volcanoes, was chased by Kamapuaa, the pig god. The crater contains a 60-acre (24-hectare) botanical garden. The cape’s eastern section constitutes Koko Head Regional Park.

Source: britannica.com